FOOD RESCUE IN AUSTRALIA

Where do Australia’s charities get their rescued food from?

Australian food rescue organisations work with each other and thousands of charities to make sure rescued food gets put to good use. Here’s the breakdown of where Australian charities get their rescued food from.

Where do Australia’s charities get their rescued food from?

Australian food rescue organisations work with each other and thousands of charities to make sure rescued food gets put to good use. Here’s the breakdown of where Australian charities get their rescued food from.

Foodbank is by far the largest organisation, accounting for 70% of all food to charities from food rescue organisations. Foodbank operates on a big scale, collecting large donations from farmers, manufacturers and retail distribution centres.

 

Farming communities work closely with Foodbank to donate and share their nutritious staple products such as rice, milk, meat, grain, eggs and fresh fruit and vegetables.

 

Foodbank receives products for all sorts of reasons and at different stages throughout the manufacturing process.

 

We work with the retailers and wholesalers at a DC/warehouse level to capture donations of ambient, chilled and fresh foods and personal and household products.

Comprehensive and consistent supply

Foodbank also partners with the food industry to manufacture essential products that don’t come via rescue channels, such as breakfast cereal, pasta and teabags. Foodbank collects, sorts, stores and shares this stock within its national network so that the food can be made available to charities throughout the country. We have over 2,400 charities registered with us, from well-known organisations such as Red Cross and the Salvos, to community-based kitchens and pantries. Our aim is to provide a comprehensive and consistent supply of all the essentials to underpin front line food relief services nationally. Foodbank’s primary mission is addressing food insecurity.

41.7 MILLION
KILOGRAMS OF
FOOD & GROCERIES

*sourced by Foodbank in a year.

Other food rescue organisations

OzHarvest and SecondBite, target small, end-of-the-day fresh and short life food surplus from stores, hotels, cafes and restaurants. This food must be consumed quickly so is distributed directly to charities without being stored. This food augments the supplies provided by Foodbank. The primary mission of OzHarvest and SecondBite is eliminating food waste.

Another organisation in the sector is FareShare. It rescues food and also receives food close to expiry from Foodbank and turns it into nutritious meals for distribution to charities.

 

Still, our research tells us that one in five Australians experienced food insecurity at some point in the past year.

 

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